Posted on Leave a comment

How Many ZX81 Power Supplies Are There?

Two Designs of the ZX81 PSU

This is another article on Sinclair power supply units (PSUs) in the PopeyMon Games and Fun series of articles. This one is on ZX81 PSUs. I have another set of articles on ZX Spectrum power supplies for all models of the ZX Spectrum.

There are at least two types of ZX81 power supply. There may be more, but I have not come across any more than just the two in the photo. If you know of others, please get in touch:

  • the UK700, which can deliver a maximum of 700mA (0.7A)
  • the UK1200, which can deliver a maximum of 1200mA (1.2A)

In the photos above, there are two different designs of the ZX81 PSU. On the left is the UK700 and on the right is the UK1200.

The cases of both UK700 and UK1200 are the same. The UK1200 for the ZX81 is almost identical to the Spectrum UK1200 that I show in one of the Spectrum articles. It uses a different connector, so extra care must be taken to check polarity. I have also not tested this out, so please do not do this unless you are sure what you are doing.

The capacitors and the circuits are quite different.

The UK700 does not have four separate diodes to create the full wave bridge rectification. It uses a special component and has two smaller 1000 uF capacitors. No fuse is visible on the mains side of the transformer, although this may be hidden.

The UK1200 has four diodes for the rectification, and one larger 2,200 uF and one smaller 1,000 capacitor. The fuse is visible on the mains side.

The UK700 may struggle if you are using peripherals with your ZX81 that use more current than the ZX81 on its own, but the UK1200 should be able to handle peripherals better.

I have used both the Sinclair 16k RAM Pack and the Memotech 16k RAM Pack successfully with both the UK700 and UK1200.

But I would be concerned as to whether the UK700 would be able to deliver the current for a ZX Printer. The UK1200 would be preferable. I have yet to test this though, as I don’t have a working ZX Printer.

Please see the warning below about the dangers of power supplies. Even those that deliver low DC voltages to the computer, still involve mains voltages which can kill.

DO NOT OPEN A POWER SUPPLY UNLESS YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU ARE DOING, AND THE DANGERS.

In any case, whether you do understand or not, it is wise to check the safety of any PSU before use. Why?

Because unless you have owned the PSU ever since buying it, you may not know what has happened to the PSU since it was manufactured. It may have been looked after in the original ZX81 polystyrene and box, and lovingly cared for during the last 35-40 years.

Or it may have lived in a damp cellar, being damaged in bad conditions and affected by temperature variations and damp. It may have even been dropped from a great height onto a stone floor. Or dragged along tarmac by your delivery courier.

You just don’t know!

So unless you know what you are doing, please seek professional help to check.

PopeyMon Games and Fun has refurbished and sold many ZX81 and Spectrum PSUs.

Please get in touch and we can provide a refurbished power supply or repair yours.

Thanks for coming to PopeyMon Games and Fun.

Posted on Leave a comment

Sinclair ZX Spectrum Power Supplies – What Types Are There (Part 6)? – The First One? UK1200?

When I started doing the research, opening up lots of Spectrum power supplies, and writing this series of articles, I had thought that the UK1400 power supply was the first one for the Spectrum, as shown below.

Power Supply for Rubber Key and Plus Types of Sinclair ZX Spectrum

But I was told by members of the Spectrum community that there was a UK1200. I had never seen one in the flesh… UNTIL NOW!

I have got one NOW! How exciting!

Model name: UK1200

Input: 240V AC

Output: -12.5V DC approx., unloaded (unregulated), maximum current rating 1.2A (1,200mA and hence the name UK1200).

When under load and being used on a Spectrum, the voltage will be nearer to what is stated on the PSU label.

Polarity: Centre Negative (not positive) Outer Positive (not negative as on most barrel connectors).

Getting the polarity is essential if you do not want to damage your Spectrum.

I do not know whether the UK1200 power supplies are suitable for any other model of Spectrum than the Issue1 Spectrum.

The strain relief on the PSU is not as stiff as on the UK1400. This might mean that it lasts longer because they are notorious for breaking.

It has a barrel connector that is not smooth. The UK1400 that was subject to a safety recall had a smooth barrel and black and white DC cable.

The insides are very similar to the UK1400. It is a full wave bridge rectifier with two smoothing capacitors. And a fuse.

I cannot verify that it the UK1200 would work on an Issue 1, because I do not own one.

However, the fact that the UK1400 power supply followed the UK1200 – or even possibly was being sold at the same time as the UK1200 – suggests that 1.2A was insufficient for the Spectrum and 1.4A was needed.

The UK1200 certainly won’t be suitable for the 128 “Toastrack” and not the (Amstrad-era) Spectrum +2 Grey. This is despite the fact that the DC (computer side) barrel connector will fit on these later models of Spectrum.

I would not recommend running any Spectrum with the UK1200 and without an Issue 1, I have no intention to!

And sorry. This power supply is not for sale.

But I do have a range of other power supplies for sale. The series of articles on this website is there to help you choose the right one.

Before use all power supplies need to be checked for safety, as well as functionality and that they are delivering the right voltage levels, current and polarity. So please note that they must be checked before use, and check the Safety article.

If you are looking to buy any power supply or want one checked, please get in touch. I will happily sell you one – fully tested and working – for the Spectrum 16/48k/Plus, for the grey +2 or the black +2 or +3. I also have a lot of other Spectrum parts, working computers and games for sale. I will happily put together a custom bundle for you.

I would like to credit and highly recommend the excellent videos by “JoulesPerCoulomb” on Youtube. “Greetings and good time of day…” to whoever this mysterious but extremely helpful man, is. His video on power supplies was a brilliant starter a few years ago to the many hours of research that I have conducted since on Spectrum power supplies, and which I present in this series of articles.

Posted on Leave a comment

A Look Inside the Original Spectrum Power Supply (16/48k Rubber Key Models)

The UK1400 PSU
The UK1400 Power Supply Unit (PSU)

On this PopeyMon Games and Fun website, in a series of articles I have tried to described all types of power supply unit (PSU) for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum models.

This goes from the first 16k and 48k rubber key models when the Spectrum was owned by Sinclair to the final disk drive version of the Spectrum, the +3 under the ownership of Amstrad. There is an index to the articles, as Part 0 of the series.

In this article, I am delving into the inside of the original Spectrum power supply, the UK1400 model.

I say original, but I’ve been told from several credible sources in the Spectrum community that the Issue 1 Spectrum had a UK1200 model. Until I see one being used on an Issue 1 Spectrum “in the flesh”, I will still call the UK1400 the original Spectrum PSU.

The UK1400 was used for all rubber key models of the Spectrum – 16k and 48k. It was also used on the Spectrum Plus with a different design.

This earlier article also talks about the UK1400. But I want to go a bit deeper here. Here are six images of the components inside the UK1400. As in the earlier article, there are several designs of the UK1400.

They are all implementations to the same specification. And all of them use a full-wave bridge rectification circuit to convert the mains 240V into around 12-14V DC (unregulated and when unloaded) via a barrel connector to the Spectrum board.

Note: A “smooth” barrel connector has been used to replace the original on the photo at the top of the article. Please see the Safety Warning article for more on the UK1400 production that were recalled for safety issues.

Each of the designs meet the UK1400 PSU Specification in different ways.

Some designs are compatible with other designs and some are not.

There are different orientations of the PCB and transformer – some designs have the PCB underneath the transformer and other designs have the PCB at right-angles and to the side of the transformer.

There are different versions of the case, so they are not interchangeable with different designs. Here is one case from a PSU that failed its tests.

And as I have said on other articles, BEFORE you plug any power supply into your beloved Spectrum, please CHECK is it safe to use: (i) for you, (ii) for your Spectrum.

I have TESTED and WORKING PSUs for sale in the PopeyMon website shop and in the eBay popeymon shop too.

If you have any questions, please get in touch.

Posted on Leave a comment

How Many Spectrum Power Supplies Are There?

Two Designs of the UK1400 PSU

This is another article on Spectrum power supplies in the PopeyMon Games and Fun series of articles.

In the photo above, there are two different designs of the UK1400 power supply unit (PSU). This was for the 16k and 48k rubber key Spectrums. As described in more detail in Part 1 of the Series and Part 3 of the Series, the UK1400 can also be used on the Spectrum Plus.

In the photo are two similar designs. But they are not identical. Can you spot the differences?

Spectrum UK1400 with Transformer on Top

Several other designs also exist, including designs where the transformer is on the top of the PCB, instead of next to it (see photo).

The cases can also differ on the inside, meaning that different designs may not be interchangeable. There are also variations in the capacitors, in the number of capacitors and even the polarity of the wires to the DC cable can be swapped, with respect to the colouring on the wires.

So what seems to be the same PSU from the outside, can be quite different on the inside.

Unless you have owned the PSU ever since buying it, you may not know what has happened to the PSU since it was manufactured. It may have been looked after in the original polys, and lovingly cared for during the last 35 years. Or it may have lived in a damp cellar, being damaged in bad conditions and affected by temperature variations and damp. It may have been dropped from a great height onto a stone floor.

You just don’t know!

And there is also the official Sinclair Safety Warning for one of the designs to consider, as described in this article here.

So using and tinkering with power supplies can put your Spectrum and more importantly, your health and safety, AT RISK!

You should check your power supplier is the right one, and that is safe for you and your Spectrum.

So unless you know what you are doing, please seek professional help.

PopeyMon Games and Fun has refurbished and sold many Spectrum PSUs.

Please get in touch and we can provide a refurbished power supply or repair yours.

There are more types of Spectrum PSU:

Please click on the links for more info on each power supply, and which can be used with each model of Spectrum. The general advice is that as each Spectrum was released, the power requirements increased. So earlier PSUs tend to NOT be compatible with later Spectrum models. In any case, the power connectors changed on the Black +2 and +3.

Thanks for coming to PopeyMon Games and Fun.

Spectrum +2 (Black) PSU
Posted on Leave a comment

Sinclair ZX Spectrum Power Supplies – What Types Are There (Part 5)? – The +3 (Disk Drive Spectrum)

The Sinclair ZX Spectrum +3 (Black)
No Tape but Floppy Drive Instead!

There are several types of Sinclair ZX Spectrum. So it follows that there are several different types of power supplies for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum.

This ranges from the rubber key 16k and 48k models, then Plus and 128 models during the Sinclair ownership of the Spectrum brand, through the Amstrad ownership of the Spectrum brand (after Alan Sugar’s Amstrad bought the rights to the Sinclair Computer brand), to the present with the new Spectrum Next.

Part 1 of the PopeyMon articles on the types of Spectrum PSU talked about the rubber key models and the Spectrum Plus.

Part 2 dealt with just the Spectrum 128 (“Toastrack”).

The Amstrad-Owned Era of the Sinclair ZX Spectrum

Part 3 dealt with just the Grey +2.

Part 4 dealt with the Black +2 (+2A and +2B).

Part 5 deals with the +3, the disk version of the Spectrum.

Like the Grey +2 and the Black +2 – although the case is similar to the Amstrad CPC, the power still comes from an external power supply. On the original design of the CPC, there was only one plug, for the monitor and computer. The power for the computer came from a lead that went from the monitor to the CPC. There was only one plug.

The +3 has one plug for the computer unit, but you still need a plug for your separate display.

Power Supply for Rubber Key and Plus Types of Sinclair ZX Spectrum

The Black +3 PSU could be referred to as a “power brick”, like the Xbox 360 PSU. It is very heavy. It generates the voltages on different lines to a DIN connector, instead of the barrel connector used for the UK1400.

The +3 PSU is much larger than the earlier Spectrum PSUs. The voltages and current rating are shown in the photos above, and described below.

It generates:

  • +5V at 2A
  • +12V at 700mA
  • -12V at 50mA

These are connected to the pins on the DIN connector. Different voltages are needed for different functions of the +3.

The ratings are VERY SIMILAR, but NOT IDENTIAL to the +2 PSU. The +3 needs more current, so the +3 power supply can be used on a Black +2. BUT NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND. The Black +2 PSU should NOT be used on a +3.

This article will be updated with some photos of the internals, in the near future.

If you are looking to buy any Sinclair power supply or want one checked, please get in touch. I will happily sell you one – fully tested and working – for the Spectrum 16/48k/Plus, for the grey +2 or the black +2 or +3. I also have a lot of other Spectrum parts, working computers and games for sale. I will happily put together a custom bundle for you.

I will be writing more about the Spectrum power supplies in the near future. This series will conclude with the Amstrad-era models of the Spectrum, the Black +2 (Part 4) and the +3 (Part 5). When I finally get my Spectrum Next (that I’ve already paid for via the Kickstarter 2), I might even do an article on that, too! Watch this space!

Posted on Leave a comment

Hungry Horace Goes Skiing? on the Sinclair ZX Spectrum

Is it Hungry Horace
or Horace Goes Skiing?
Photo Courtesy of Martin Russell

Horace is one of the most famous, iconic even, characters of games on the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. There were three official titles in the Horace series from Australian software house Melbourne House:

  1. Hungry Horace (1982)
  2. Horace Goes Skiing (1982)
  3. Horace and the Spiders (1983)

But what is the game in the photo at the top? Is it Hungry Horace? Is it Horace Goes Skiing? Or is it Hungry Horace Goes Skiing?

It is a misprint and is a rarer find in the world of collecting Spectrum games!

PopeyMon is currently working on a disassembly of Horace Goes Skiing. A disassembly is a reverse engineering of the machine code programming that makes up a Spectrum program.

It is being done using SkoolKit, the excellent software tools written in Python by Richard Dymond. Richard has done a disassembly of Hungry Horace, as well as other iconic Spectrum games like Skool Daze, back to Skool, Manic Miner (more articles are on PopeyMon about Manic Miner – see the tags) and Jet Set Willy.

Manic Miner

Richard has also made another great contribution to Spectrum programming by publishing an online version of The Complete Spectrum ROM Disassembly, originally published by Melbourne House of Horace fame.

UPDATE (29/4/21): Undocumented features and keyboard controls found! Possible “missing” 11th ZX Spectrum ROM Cartridge game? The READ_KEYBOARD routine has been disassembled. I have published it at this link here. There is some tidying up that is needed, and the non-keyboard sections need to be understood more clearly, but I wanted to report some interesting news for Horace fans! The inlay for Horace Goes Skiing only reports four keys to play the game – QZIP for up/down/left/right.

BUT… In doing the disassembly, I discovered more keys. 1234 and 6789 can also be used to control Horace. In fact, all three key combinations QZIP/1234/6789 can be used simultaneously.

To me, this suggests that Horace Goes Skiing was considered for a release on the ZX Spectrum ROM cartridge format. It is by no means definitive proof – just a theory. But there are other reasons – please see below. I have discussed it with the author of the definitive website on ZX Spectrum ROM cartridges here – Paul Farrow. I have also published it to a couple of the Spectrum forums, and it has generated some interest. More on that another time.

Undocumented Keys for Horace Goes Skiing

I have tested my disassembly findings by loading Horace Goes Skiing from tape onto a proper Spectrum instead of an emulator. I attached my Kempston Joystick Interface with ROM cartridge – this is very similar to the ZX Interface 2. I have confirmed my findings on the undocumented keys:

  1. I have confirmed that all three key combinations and/or the Interface 2 joystick ports can be used simultaneously.
  2. The S key can be pressed to PAUSE Horace Goes Skiing. Keys on the bottom left half-row can be used to resume.
  3. The ENTER key can be used to “toggle” (turn off and turn on) the Ambulance sound. This seems to have an effect on the running of the game too, but whether it can be used as a CHEAT to slow the Ambulance down is unknown so far.
  4. Pressing the G and H keys simultaneously ABORTS THE GAME.

In addition to this, there are also the following reasons to support my theory that Horace Goes Skiing was going to be the 11th ROM cartridge game, but was abandoned:

Horace Goes Skiing Is A Possible 11th ZX Rom Cartridge

I believe that Horace Goes Skiing may have been a candidate for ROM cartridges, as:

  1. Skiing is the “sequel” to Hungry Horace.
  2. Horace and the Spiders and Hungry Horace were released on ROM cartridge, but Skiing was not.
  3. Skiing is a 16k game, which was required for the ROM cartridges.
  4. Skiing was released at about the right time, on the Sinclair label.

Paul Farrow has come back with his views as to why Skiing may or may not have been intended for a ROM cartridge. We have continued the conversation, but he says that:

“Iā€™m not so sure it does suggest that, but neither do I rule out the theory off hand. I think more evidence would be required to draw that as a definite conclusion.”

I will keep following up on my theory and diassembling the rest of the game. But for now… that is all!

UPDATE (23/4/21): The .skool files have been updated to document a lot more of the disassembly. The purpose of around 50% of the routines has been determined and many routines have now been fully understood and documented.

At the time of writing, my disassembly of Horace Goes Skiing has made substantial progress:

  • The initial trickery of game loading and movement of data and code, after the game has loaded, has been hurdled.
  • The main game loop has been found and some of the sub-routines have been documented such as the squelchy sound of the attract mode and the colour attribute animations.
  • The main text strings for the game messages have been found.
  • And the SkoolKit tool has been mastered to enable publishing of the disassembly on the PopeyMon Games and Fun website.

So keep ’em peeled for the disassembly, if you want to learn more about Horace and his games.

You might even learn some machine code and how to use SkoolKit!

Posted on Leave a comment

What Kind of Spectrum Would You Like?

An Original 48k Sinclair ZX Spectrum
Refurbished For A Happy Customer

Above is a photo of an original 48k Sinclair ZX Spectrum with the rubber keys, which has been refurbished to a very high standard by PopeyMon Games and Fun.

It was sold in a package which was put together by PopeyMon following a request by a customer for a custom bundle, so that he could get the joy back from having a Spectrum just like the one he had almost 40 years ago. The Spectrum was released in 1982.

It is the customer’s own photo, which he has given permission for me to use. PopeyMon has been given the following endorsement by the customer, Mr. L. Stevenson of Essex:

“I received my Speccy bundle today all packaged and looking amazing… everything is in great working order as promised and I can now enjoy playing my spectrum 48k once again after 40 years! Extremely happy with the service and delivery of such a special machine. Thank you”

PopeyMon has put together many Spectrums, and custom bundles, and many types of Spectrum, for a lot of happy customers over the past two years.

So what kind of Spectrum would you like?

Do you want it to be like the original Spectrum above, or another model as shown below? PopeyMon has expertise in all models of Sinclair ZX Spectrum, in repairing them and refurbishing them.

Would you like it to be refurbished?

If you do want it to be refurbished, you can choose any of the following options, and I will give you a good price on the work and an agreed timescale for delivery. I also package things up properly, as shown in the endorsement above.

The above Spectrum + (Plus) has been opened up, as shown in the last photo. The machines are nearly forty years old now, so it is unsurprising that most will need some work.

This Spectrum + has been refurbished to a very high standard, with the following work done by PopeyMon:

  1. all electrolytic capacitors have been replaced with high quality Vishay capacitors. This is not absolutely necessary, because a Spectrum can operate successfully with the old ones, but they can deteriorate over time with heat, age, usage and under bad storage conditions. They can then damage other components, such as the RAM chips that are more difficult to replace,
  2. a better ULA chip, the 6C0001E-7 model which was the last one for the original rubber key models and Spectrum Plus,
  3. a new modern voltage regulator which means the Spectrum runs cooler and the heatsink can be removed,
  4. a new keyboard membrane, not shown in the photo above. These are manufactured new. The old ones usually dry out and stop working, and the ribbons that attach them to the computer’s board inside, become brittle and break. It is fitted for the customer,
  5. the TV display has been modified to be a composite video output, instead of the traditional
  6. the case and keys have been thoroughly cleaned, including every single key
  7. the edge connector has been tested with a joystick interface and with a modern SD-card solution such as DivMMC, Interface 1.bis or Retroleum Smart Card
  8. very thorough testing

Would you like a repair done? Send me some details of your machine to get the conversation going, with as much detail as you can of the symptoms and photos if possible. I can also do a part-exchange.

Would you like a tape player to load and save games?

Would you like a joystick and joystick interface to play games without using the keyboard?

What games would you like to play? I have a large stock and can get games in for you on commission.

Would you like your power supply checked and refurbished? These are old now. Do you really know that it is safe to use? I am PAT trained and have a lot of experience with these power supplies. I have a comprehensive guide to all Spectrum power supplies on this website. Be VERY careful what you might buy on eBay or cheap from China, without checking. What might seem OK could kill your Spectrum! Do get in touch.

PopeyMon offers all of the above services and products, plus more. I also buy Spectrums and anything Spectrum-related. I offer other products and services too.

Get in touch with PopeyMon – Contact Details at the link – for all your Spectrum needs!

Posted on Leave a comment

Sinclair ZX Spectrum Power Supplies – What Types Are There? A Series Of Articles – Part 0 – Foreword and Introduction

The Sinclair ZX Spectrum with rubber keys

There are several types of Sinclair ZX Spectrum. So it follows that there are several different types of power supplies for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum.

The first type was the rubber key 16k and 48k models (as shown in the above photos). Next were the Plus and 128 models during the Sinclair ownership of the Spectrum brand.

Sinclair then hit financial problems. After Alan Sugar’s Amstrad bought the rights to the Sinclair Computer brand, there was the Amstrad ownership of the Spectrum brand.

And now, in the present, we have the new Spectrum Next. This latter era may be added in the future.

The Sinclair-Owned Era of the Sinclair ZX Spectrum

Power Supply for Rubber Key and Plus Types of Sinclair ZX Spectrum

The power supply unit (PSU) shown in the photo above is a UK1400 model, which is OK for use on 16k and 48k rubber key models. The one below is the Spectrum Plus version of the UK1400.

Spectrum Plus version of the UK1400 Power Supply

The PSUs for these models are interchangeable. However, with the models after these, it becomes more complicated.

The articles in this series explain more about compatibilities and incompatibilities, especially in the Grey +2 article (Part 3), after the initial models have been introduced.

Part 1 of the Series looks at the rubber-keyed Spectrum and Spectrum + (Plus) and is here.

The Sinclair ZX Spectrum 128 “Toastrack”

Part 2 of the Series deals with only the 128 a.k.a. “Toastrack”, so called because of the huge black heat sink on the right-hand-side of the case. This was the last Sinclair-owned model of the Spectrum.

The Amstrad-owned Era of the Sinclair ZX Spectrum

Sinclair ZX Spectrum +2 (Grey)

Part 3 looks at the first Amstrad-era Spectrum, the Grey +2. Some people view this machine as half-way between the Sinclair and Amstrad eras of the Spectrum, due to the combination of the new case and old 128 board inside. But the PSUs are NOT swappable, as they produce different maximum power outputs and the machines have different power consumption. More info is in the article, as well as information about compatibilities and incompatibilities.

The Sinclair ZX Spectrum +2 (Black)

Part 4 deals with the Black +2 models, the +2A and +2B. These models are more Amstrad-influenced, with the power circuit totally removed from the main board and placed into an external “power brick”.

Sinclair ZX Spectrum +3 (Disk Version)

Part 5 will look only at the +3, the disk version of the Spectrum. This was the last model designed BITD (Back In The Day), but was not the last released, because of the +2A/+2B/+3A/+3B versions that were released at different times. This article has not been completed yet.

If you are looking to buy any Sinclair power supply or want one checked, please get in touch.

I will happily sell you one – fully tested and working – for the Spectrum 16/48k/Plus, for the grey +2 or the black +2 or +3.

I also have a lot of other Spectrum parts, working computers and games for sale.

I will happily put together a custom bundle for you and have done so for my customers – please see my Feedback on the About page.

PopeyMon Games and Fun
Posted on 1 Comment

Manic Miner For Collectors (Part 0) – Foreword and Introduction

Manic Miner for the Spectrum and MSX
It was released for many other platforms
with many variants

Manic Miner is one of the classic computer and video games of all time.

It was released on the Sinclair ZX Spectrum and for many other platforms with many variants, releases and editions.

But as it stood in late 2020, it appeared that those variants, releases and editions were not documented in any one place.

Collectors love variants and so PopeyMon Games and Fun wanted to perform this service for the gaming community and the Spectrum community.

The series of articles on Manic Miner for Collectors is based on the research by collector and expert Adrian Grubb, seen by many as the authority on Manic Miner versions and passionate collector of all things Manic Miner.

Adrian’s research was reviewed over many years by a great many people on the Central Cavern Facebook group. PopeyMon got Adrian’s permission to use and edit the articles, and to publish them on the web, with his photos. Before these articles were published, Adrian reviewed them for correctness and completeness (see footnote *).

The articles deal only with the Sinclair ZX Spectrum releases of Manic Miner. The articles do not look at the internals of the game itself – only the inlay, cassettes, boxes and covers and the variants of these in the editions and releases for the Spectrum.

Part 1 of the Manic Miner For Collectors series is about the First Edition, First Release on Bug Byte – the so-called “Whistler” version. See Footnote*.

Part 2 was on the First Edition, Second Release that was also from Bug Byte, the so-called “Lantern” version. See Footnote*.

Part 3 is about the version that was released on the Software Projects label, the “mutant telephone” release.

The game was released on many other platforms, including the MSX (er… pun intended for this platform game!), as shown in the photo above. These articles do not look at those platforms, although there might be updates in the future.

I have had a request to do a series for the Horace games. Look out for that soon! šŸ™‚

PopeyMon Games and Fun

Footnote*.

Please note that every effort has been made to check the information in these articles. They were reviewed by Adrian Grubb and altered to update them, before publication.

During a review of the articles on the Central Cavern Facebook, and when published via Twitter, there was a lot of very positive feedback from fans.

These articles are published to fill a gap in knowledge for collectors, and are provided in good faith. If you believe that you have evidence that there are inaccuracies, please get in touch at the contact details here.

Controversy? Following many years of enthusiasts discussing the game in a civilised manner, and there being an established view based on Adrian’s work, one person, who shall remain nameless at this point, got in touch with PopeyMon and Adrian via Facebook and broadcast a berating attitude via Twitter.

Instead of praising the work, this person made a series of unsubstantiated claims in relation to the order of the first two releases. His approach was not to approach PopeyMon or Adrian in private, but to heavily criticise the work in public. This is not how the Spectrum community usually behaves.

Sadly, it appears that this approach greatly upset Adrian, meaning that Adrian deleted the original articles and an Admin switched off comments on the post in the Facebook group. Meaning that discussion could not take place.

PopeyMon will be getting in touch with this person, in private, to see if he can provide evidence of his claims. At present, all that can be seen are anecdotes and claims, but if evidence is presented, perhaps the articles will be updated.

Collecting should be a pleasure, and these articles are provided in good faith for collectors to refer to, and the accuracy thereof will continue to be a work in progress. The Spectrum community is very good natured and always has been. It will remain that way, despite a few who might not display the traditional attitude, from time to time.

PopeyMon Games and Fun.

Posted on 1 Comment

Sinclair ZX Spectrum Power Supplies – What Types Are There (Part 4)? – Black +2

The Sinclair ZX Spectrum +2 (Black)
a.k.a. +2A/+2B – SPANISH VERSION SHOWN

There are several types of Sinclair ZX Spectrum. So it follows that there are several different types of power supplies for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum.

This ranges from the rubber key 16k and 48k models, then Plus and 128 models during the Sinclair ownership of the Spectrum brand, through the Amstrad ownership of the Spectrum brand (after Alan Sugar’s Amstrad bought the rights to the Sinclair Computer brand), to the present with the new Spectrum Next.

Part 1 of the PopeyMon articles on the types of Spectrum PSU talked about the rubber key models and the Spectrum Plus. Part 2 dealt with just the Spectrum 128 (“Toastrack”). Part 3 dealt with just the Grey +2.

This article talks about the second Spectrum of the Amstrad era – the Black Sinclair ZX Spectrum +2. Two models exist of the Black +2 – the +2A and the +2B. Both models use the same power supply.

The Black +2 is not to be confused with the Grey +2 as it can look like it is (dark) grey, and vice versa, depending on the light and the photos.

Although they look quite similar on the outside, they are quite different machines “under the hood”, with the Black +2 PCBs being very different to the Grey +2 PCB, which is closer to the Toastrack PCB and therefore the Sinclair-era models of Spectrum.

Like the Grey +2, the Black +2 includes a “proper” full-sized hard keyboard, a much larger case than the Sinclair-era machines, and a tape player (“Datacorder”) built-in. Also like the Grey, it includes two joystick ports, plus more ports on the back that include an RGB display output as well as the normal RF output. This latter similarity is like the Toastrack and Grey.

Again, like the Grey +2 – although the case is like the Amstrad CPC, the power still comes from an external power supply. On the original design of the CPC, there was only one plug, for the monitor and computer. The power came from a lead that went from the monitor to the CPC. And unlike a lot of Amstrad’s products that only needed one plug (including the CPC), the Grey +2 needs more than one plug, because it needs a plug for the external display as well as the computer unit.

Power Supply for Rubber Key and Plus Types of Sinclair ZX Spectrum

The power supply (PSU) shown in the photo above is a UK1400 model, which is OK for use on 16k and 48k rubber key models. The one below is the Spectrum Plus version of the UK1400.

Spectrum Plus version of the UK1400 Power Supply

None of the UK1400 power supplies above are suitable for any other model of Spectrum – not the 128 “Toastrack” and not the (Amstrad-era) Spectrum +2 Grey. And definitely not the Black +2 or +3.

Why? Firstly, the connector is totally different – the Black +2 uses a DIN connector and not a barrel connector.

Secondly, the PSU and main board of the Black +2 are very different to the Sinclair-era Spectrum models. The DC-DC conversion circuit that caused so many problems on the Sinclair-era machines (and still does!), has been removed. And the work is now done in the PSU itself. However, there are quite a few problems with the Black +2 PSU, that you need to be aware of. If you are not sure, do not do the work yourself. Get in touch with PopeyMon.

The Black +2 PSU could be referred to as a “power brick”, like the Xbox 360 PSU. It is very heavy. It generates the voltages on different lines to the DIN connector.

It is much larger than the earlier Spectrum PSUs. The voltages and current rating are shown in the photos above.

It generates:

  • +5V at 2A
  • +12V at 200mA
  • -12V at 50mA

These are connected to the pins on the DIN connector. Different voltages are needed for different functions of the Black +2.

As will be seen in the final article of the series, Part 5, the +3 disk model of the Spectrum, has a similar power supply. But the +3 needs more current, so the +3 power supply can be used on a Black +2. BUT NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND. The Black +2 PSU should NOT be used on a +3.

This article will be updated with some photos of the internals, in the near future.

If you are looking to buy any Sinclair power supply or want one checked, please get in touch. I will happily sell you one – fully tested and working – for the Spectrum 16/48k/Plus, for the grey +2 or the black +2 or +3. I also have a lot of other Spectrum parts, working computers and games for sale. I will happily put together a custom bundle for you.

I will be writing more about the Spectrum power supplies in the near future. This series will conclude with the Amstrad-era models of the Spectrum, the Black +2 (Part 4) and the +3 (Part 5). When I finally get my Spectrum Next (that I’ve already paid for via the Kickstarter 2), I might even do an article on that, too! Watch this space!

P.S. According to one Speccy fan, it appears that the rare Issue 1 Spectrum used an earlier version of the power supply, not the UK1400. And according to the great JoulesPerCoulomb on Youtube, even a UK700 was used. But as I’ve said elsewhere, you cannot trust either the original manufacturer, or other people who may have fiddled around with the PSU before you got it. So you need to check in all cases, no matter what the label on the PSU claims!